My Response to the New York Times Article on Bloggers

In response to a lot of hooplah over the New York Times article about bloggers and the Bloggy Bootcamp, I wrote this comment to Tiffany and Heather, of the Secret is in the Sauce, and founders of the Bloggy Bootcamp. I hope you’ll read the article, if you are a blogger, or just interested in knowing what they’re all talking about.  I might add, that I am not on the bandwagon of giveaways, PR, etc., though, if that’s what you do, fine.  My purpose is to disciple women, to help them, to do what the Lord tells me to do.  I pray that what I write is pleasing to Him, and also helpful to you. Today is no exception.

Here is my comment over on SITS:
“Tiffany and Heather,
Let me first say, I don’t blog for money. I’m a SAHM who loves the Lord and wants to help other women. However, though the title was an “unfortunate choice” and a bit misleading, this article is excellent, and is, or will be, an avalanche of free advertising for SITS and Bloggy Bootcamps, and all the blogs this New York Times author linked, if you don’t shoot yourselves in the foot by attacking it. May I suggest that perhaps you need to take a step back and gain some perspective. Tiffany and Heather, this article praised you.

Quoting, “Yes, they had come to Bloggy Boot Camp, the sold-out first stop on a five-city tour. It is the brainchild of Tiffany Romero and Heather Blair, the founders of the Secret Is in the Sauce, a community of 5,000 female bloggers. Boot Camp is at once a networking and social event, bringing together virtual friends for some real-time girly bonding, and an educational seminar designed to help the participants — about 90 percent of them mothers — to take their blogs up a notch, whether in hopes of generating ad revenue and sponsorships, attracting attention to a cause or branching out into paid journalism or marketing.”

Other positive quotes,
“The blogosphere is where authentic conversation is happening,” said Pamela Parker, a senior manager with Federated Media..”Marketers are recognizing that they want to be there, associated with that authentic conversation,” Ms. Parker said.

“Embellished with professional graphics, pithy tag lines and labels like ‘PR Friendly,’ these blogs have become a burgeoning industry generating incomes ranging from $25 a month in what one blogger called ‘latte money’ to, for a very elite few, six figures.”
We’re not all making big bucks, or even trying to, but obviously many are trying to sell on their blogs. Have we become supersensitive? Are we taking ourselves too seriously or do we just need to take a good hard look in the mirror?

This was not hate, or if it was, may I stand next to you, Tiffany and Heather, the next time you’re receiving some?
Wendy
Faith’s Firm Foundation
www.faithfultojesus.blogspot.com

(If you go to SITS, read Kevin Berry’s very well-written, unbiased opinion, which I totally agreed with.)

Comments?

5 Replies to “My Response to the New York Times Article on Bloggers”

  1. Hi Lora!
    Yes, I have learned to not let it bother me too much when I'm in the minority, and I, too, find myself there quite often these days, and have, as you said, “grown quite comfortable there”!
    Thanks for the encouragement to speak out what I believe! I really appreciate it!
    Have a great day!
    Wendy (Make sure to read my comment back to the others above with my “new thoughts” on the subject!)

  2. I'm visiting your blog because of that very comment! After I left my own, I decided to visit each person who had also left a comment disagreeing with the status quo over there. There weren't many of us, for sure, but I have no problem with that 🙂 I'm very often in the minority on things and I've grown quite comfortable there!

    Thank you for being willing to put yourself out there with your opinion. Have a wonderful day!

  3. Pam and Andye,
    Thanks for your comments! I have been thinking more and more about this, and also looked at the picture more closely, and here's my theory: You know that when an accusation has absolutely no validity to it, you just laugh, or shrug it off. But when there's a grain of truth to it, you will often get really upset! That's what I think happened here. The article hit too close to home! I know how hard it is for a mom not to become obsessed with blogging and neglect her duties and responsibilities. I think that those who are so offended are feeling just a little guilty and they're trying to rationalize what they're doing. If they were totally innocent, it wouldn't bother them at all.
    What do you think?
    Wendy

  4. Hey! I'm a fellow SAHM and home schooler! I like what you wrote about the good things that were in the article and the fact that it will be great advertising. I think the biggest problems with the article were the title and the really insulting picture that was posted that implied that mommy bloggers were neglecting their children in order to blog. Either way, they're going to end up with much more traffic! 🙂

  5. Wendy,

    I saw your excellent comment at SITS at just had to come here and tell you how much I liked what you had to say. I'm happy to see that you posted about it here as well. I wholeheartedly agree with you. I didn't think there was anything about the article that was offensive – except the title which didn't really relate to the content of the article at all. I just don't get why so many bloggers are up in arms about this. Glad I'm not the only one.

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